Tommy Tweedie

31st July, 2018 •
Posted In: Other
Written By: Graeme Macleod •
Comments: 0 Comments

EVERYONE at Nairn County Football Club has been shocked and deeply saddened by the sudden loss of lifelong supporter, Tommy Tweedie. He was 54.

Tommy was the son of Margaret and the late Tommy Tweedie, successful hoteliers in Nairn who ran the Stafford Hotel and latterly, the Regal Bar.

An extremely likeable and energetic man, Tommy (pictured second from right with good friends (from left) Sam Lean, Andrew Paterson and Douglas ‘Spud’ Smith after the 2011 Highland League (Morganti) Cup final) made the most of the life he was given, turning his hand to any given number of different sports and outdoor activities. Not only trying out something new or something different but invariably being good at it too.

It is fair to say he was a man who probably never understood the meaning of the term “quiet weekend to myself” – he was always active physically and mentally be it out skiing, hillwalking, kayaking, road running, watching live music, at the football, spending time with friends and loved ones or giving his children wholesome love and support in their own ventures.

He had a real zest for life and never did things by halves – if he fancied a walk then it was probably up a Munro or a challenging Corbett; if there was band playing that he wanted to see live and it involved a long drive home afterwards on a work night, he was at the gig without a second’s thought; he would burn the midnight oils until the painting he was currently working on looked just right before putting down his brushes; when it came to kayaking, he did not just learn to paddle around the Nairn Harbour area, he conquered Loch Ness. And if he was free to see the Nairn County team in action, it did not matter if the game was at Station Park or as far away as Wick or a Scottish Cup tie down in the Central Belt, he would be there to give the players his backing without a moment’s hesitation.

Tommy was a gentleman who always saw the bigger picture when it came to football. His support for the team was unwavering and regardless of the performance or the result on a Saturday, there was never a negative word to be said – just 100 percent support. He proved that in deed as well as words – he was a talented artist who spent many, many hours perfecting his painting of the ground prior to the demolition of the old Cowshed (pictured above). And when it came to auctioning off his fantastic piece of work, he donated every penny raised to the Supporters Ground Improvements Fund, a fundraising effort that supported the construction of the Davy Johnston Enclosure, which now stands proudly on the north side of the ground.

Equally as comfortable in his own company or with others, Tommy was an engaging and knowledgeable guy who was good company to all, so would never have had to look far for some companionship be it for one of his day-long physical endeavours or a relaxing pint at the bar.

He was never happier than when he was on the ski slopes, scaling another hill, paddling in a kayak, at a gig, with paint brush in hand or supporting his football team. But more than all these things put together, he took great joy and pride in the company and achievements of his family, friends and loved ones.

There will be a minute’s silence in Tommy’s memory prior to Wednesday’s match at Station Park against Elgin City. Kick-off is at 8.00 pm.

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